Games Based Learning

The use of “Game Based Learning” in schools and with teachers to improve student engagement in topics can have a measurable effect on student success in subjects like math, science, reading and languages. In the modern education system game based learning and brain training solutions have the potential to bolster teaching methods while educational games in the classroom are fast proving an invaluable tool to connect and engage students. Games in the classroom in any form have shown to increase student motivation through engagement.

brain training classroom

However to avoid confusion it needs to be pointed out that “Gamification” and “Game Based Learning” in education are not the same thing. So let us dig a little deeper into Gamification vs. Game-Based Learning.

The term “Gamification” within a school context would likely refer to the use of game-like principles when teaching. In a classroom setting this might be a teacher having a game and assigning points or rewards for various classroom activities like participation. So when a teacher assigns points to a student, uses a leader board, or hands out badges, he or she is using gamification. On the flip side, Game Based Learning means incorporating educational games in teacher instruction within the classroom for a range of subjects. These games can be subject specific like math or reading, help with overall cognitive and learning skills like “Brain Training” or even “Video Games” for computer classes. The important aspect of game based learning is they must have a measurable impact on the student in terms of grades, IQ, exams and learning ability.

Nowhere else is the use of games more important than education. The lack of student motivation can be easily demonstrated in high school dropout rates, every year approximately 1.2 million students fail to graduate from school. Some academics argue that this is due to current systemic flaws in the way students learn and acquire knowledge while others argue that schools are behind the times.<br.

So as a teacher, why use games based learning in the classroom?

Game based learning has the capability to change the way teachers run their classes and the way their students experience learning. In a classroom that uses game based learning, a teacher can assign online learning games or even videos for students to watch as part of classwork, outside of class as part of identified learning areas or even as homework. Game based learning can help students with collaboration, experimentation; improve problem solving skills, raise IQ levels and application of the concepts in math or science. So instead of using all the class time in rote learning, teachers become guides who are available to assist students to improve learning skills and the application of concepts across subjects.

Parents, teachers and students know that education as it is currently delivered is broken. Game based learning like SMART Brain Training can help make education work. Using games in education to improve intellectual skills and to make learning easier (especially for kids with learning difficulties) is a unique value proposition for both teacher and student.